Running Course

    Running Course

    Running Course

    How to Start Running

    If it were as easy as slipping on your shoes and rolling out the front door, you wouldn’t be reading this. Listen: we know that if you’re someone who has never run, or you’ve fallen out of a routine, lacing up for a first run can feel overwhelming.

    But it doesn’t need to be that way, says Nike Running Global Head Coach Chris Bennett. “The hardest part is not finishing the first run, it's starting the first run. Once you accept that, everything gets easier.”

    Coach Bennett is all about dropping the running wisdom, and we’re here for it. Here’s a list of things—practical and mental—to help you prep for your first run.

    • Don’t overthink it. Just go
    • Don’t stress your pace
    • Stop before you need to
    • Prevent injury with stretching
    • Stay on track with a training plan
    • Get the right gear

    Going on Your First Run

    Don’t overthink it. Just go.

    Don’t overthink it. Just go.

    What’s that saying we use at Nike? Just do it. Put your shoes on and go. It’s as simple as that.

    Don’t stress your pace

    Don’t stress your pace

    “Your effort should feel easy,” says Coach. “Not fast or slow—easy.” That means: start slow, pick up the pace when it feels good, and back off if it starts to feel hard.

    Stop before you need to

    Stop before you need to

    The point of this run is to finish it. “Your goal isn’t to run a certain distance,” says Coach. “You want to feel strong, not depleted, when you’re ready to stop.”

    The first run has nothing to do with pace, nothing to do with distance, nothing to do with duration. It’s about starting it and ending it and wanting to do a next run.

    Chris Bennett
    Nike Running Global Head Coach

    Get an extra push with a guided run

    The Nike Run Club’s guided runs take you alongside Nike coaches, athletes, and special guests who encourage you every step of the way.

    Prevent injury with stretching

    Stretch while moving before your run …

    Aim to do a few minutes of stretching with movement (a.k.a. dynamic stretching) before your run. Why this kind specifically? It mimics the full range of motion of a run, which helps you get looser, faster. If you’re still feeling tight during your run, it’s ok to stop and stretch some more. No guilt! That helps you to finish feeling great.

    …and finish up with still stretches

    Fact: Doing dynamic and static stretches (ones you hold) post-run helps prevent injury and improve flexibility. “Those few minutes are so important,” says Coach. “They’ll make your next run better, I promise.” Need some tips on the best stretching routines for runners? The Nike Training Club app has you covered.

    Prevent injury with stretching

    Stretch while moving before your run …

    Aim to do a few minutes of stretching with movement (a.k.a. dynamic stretching) before your run. Why this kind specifically? It mimics the full range of motion of a run, which helps you get looser, faster. If you’re still feeling tight during your run, it’s ok to stop and stretch some more. No guilt! That helps you to finish feeling great.

    …and finish up with still stretches

    Fact: Doing dynamic and static stretches (ones you hold) post-run helps prevent injury and improve flexibility. “Those few minutes are so important,” says Coach. “They’ll make your next run better, I promise.” Need some tips on the best stretching routines for runners? The Nike Training Club app has you covered.

    Stay on track with a training plan

    Set a goal

    The easiest way to get moving on a consistent basis is to work toward a goal. And we’ve got one for whatever feels right for you. Just want to get into a rhythm? Try our First 10 plan. From there you can work toward a 5K, 10K, and beyond.



    First 10 Plan

    Slowly build your endurance and distance through speed runs, long runs, and uphill climbs. Complete these 10 workouts and you’ll be stronger and fitter than you were when you started. You might even start calling yourself a runner. Explore Plan

    5K Plan

    This 3.1-mile target is a great way to see if you even like training for a race. An 8-week plan that involves speed work and a maximum 5-mile run is totally doable, even for new runners. Explore Plan

    10K Plan

    You’ll learn a lot of running terminology as you train for this 6.2-mile distance, like the difference between your tempo pace, 5K pace, and 10K pace (tempo is the fastest one, 10K is the slowest). And you’ll build endurance through interval training and distance runs as long as 7 miles. Explore Plan

    Get the right gear

    Find the right shoe for your run

    Not all running shoes are created equal. Some are made for long runs, some for speed, some for comfort. Our Running Footwear Guide helps you match your goals with the right pair. Footwear Guide

    Clothes that make it easier

    You can run in almost anything, but things like a supportive sports bra, socks that breathe, and shorts that don’t chafe—they can also keep you focused. We’ve got the basics for whatever you need.

    Clothes that make it easier

    You can run in almost anything, but things like a supportive sports bra, socks that breathe, and shorts that don’t chafe—they can also keep you focused. We’ve got the basics for whatever you need.

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    If you’ve ever run on the beach, you know—it can be hard! These tips that Coach Bennett shares with pro surfer Cayla Moore will make all the difference.

    How To Run With Your Dog

    How To Run With Your Dog

    Get your pup off the couch and on the trail. Coach Bennett chats with Nike trail runner and dog mom Keely Henninger about the right way to do it.