The beautiful game: Five designers create five designs inspired by the US Womens National Team

The beautiful game: Five designers create five designs inspired by the US Womens National Team

Ahead of the US Womens National Team’s trip to France, designers Makayla Wray, Tia, Fisayo Quadri, Cristina Tompkins and wuzg00d all cut, stitched and crafted the USWNT jersey to create one of a kind pieces to be displayed at Nike Soho.

 

Their stories are all different, but the dream remained the same: To create something new out of something great.

 

Here are the stories behind each design. Visit Nike Soho now to see the installation and to shop the USWNT jersey.

Ahead of the US Womens National Team’s trip to France, designers Makayla Wray, Tia, Fisayo Quadri, Cristina Tompkins and wuzg00d all cut, stitched and crafted the USWNT jersey to create one of a kind pieces to be displayed at Nike Soho.

 

Their stories are all different, but the dream remained the same: To create something new out of something great.

 

Here are the stories behind each design. Visit Nike Soho now to see the installation and to shop the USWNT jersey.

“One of my first designs was for my older sister’s team. They didn't have much funding, so we had to use the same t-shirts as the boys team, cutting and re-tying the shirts to create an identity for a team that didn’t have one. For this project I wanted to extend that idea, to represent the women on and off the field still fighting to win, no matter their shape, no matter their game.”

“One of my first designs was for my older sister’s team. They didn't have much funding, so we had to use the same t-shirts as the boys team, cutting and re-tying the shirts to create an identity for a team that didn’t have one. For this project I wanted to extend that idea, to represent the women on and off the field still fighting to win, no matter their shape, no matter their game.”

- Makayla Wray

- Makayla Wray

“In the 16th century, ruffles were a sign of social status. The larger the ruffles, the higher the status. Except they were never worn by anyone of color, let alone a woman of color. So naturally, I wanted to bring ruffles into a design that was inspired by such a diverse group of women.”

“In the 16th century, ruffles were a sign of social status. The larger the ruffles, the higher the status. Except they were never worn by anyone of color, let alone a woman of color. So naturally, I wanted to bring ruffles into a design that was inspired by such a diverse group of women.”

- Tia

- Tia

“I grew up influenced by both Nigerian and American culture, I saw how powerful color can be in showing personality. Red, white and blue is a very confident trio of colors, so I let that confidence guide my work. Just like the women who wear the jersey, I loved connecting that power of confidence with the power of having fun.”

“I grew up influenced by both Nigerian and American culture, I saw how powerful color can be in showing personality. Red, white and blue is a very confident trio of colors, so I let that confidence guide my work. Just like the women who wear the jersey, I loved connecting that power of confidence with the power of having fun.”

- Fisayo Quadri

- Fisayo Quadri

“Tierna Davidson was my muse for this. She had this dream to be an astronaut, which is crazy because my passion is protective wear. I’ve literally worked on prototypes for aerospace, so it was a perfect match. I thought of the US Womens National Team as the first all-female space walk. Like what would they wear if they didn’t just go to France, if they went to space instead.”

“Tierna Davidson was my muse for this. She had this dream to be an astronaut, which is crazy because my passion is protective wear. I’ve literally worked on prototypes for aerospace, so it was a perfect match. I thought of the US Womens National Team as the first all-female space walk. Like what would they wear if they didn’t just go to France, if they went to space instead.”

- Cristina Tompkins

- Cristina Tompkins

“This is an era where it’s becoming more uncomfortable to be old-fashioned in your ideas about women. So I created my piece to celebrate that moment. To celebrate the power of a woman who can choose who she wants to be, and when she wants to be it.”

“This is an era where it’s becoming more uncomfortable to be old-fashioned in your ideas about women. So I created my piece to celebrate that moment. To celebrate the power of a woman who can choose who she wants to be, and when she wants to be it.”

- wuzg00d x Sel

- wuzg00d x Sel