TIMOTHY WEAH

TIMOTHY WEAH

“I’ve done a lot to get here. I’ve faced a lot of people who said that I would always be in my father’s shadow. I just take that and I use that as a boost. Because as much as I love my father,

I’m trying to make a name for myself.”

 

Tim’s crazy dream? To lead by example. To show the next generation of American soccer players that the global game is theirs for the taking, and to do it all as a New Yorker.

 

“I’ve done a lot to get here. I’ve faced a lot of people who said that I would always be in my father’s shadow. I just take that and I use that as a boost. Because as much as I love my father,

I’m trying to make a name for myself.”

 

Tim’s crazy dream? To lead by example. To show the next generation of American soccer players that the global game is theirs for the taking, and to do it all as a New Yorker.

 

Tim came up schooling kids on the field at a very young age. From the beginning, it was clear that he had something special, if unrefined.

 

“I was 2, but, I was playing like a 5-year-old. So technically I was ahead of the game, but I was ball hogging, trying to run to goal and score. All I really cared about was scoring. I didn’t really care about anything else. I thought I was playing by myself.”

 

Once Tim started to play traveling for Rosedale and Gottschee, that’s when the hard lessons of being a teammate hit him.

 

“I switched up and learned how to play with a team about the age of 6. I was benched sometimes so I had to figure out a way to make the starting lineup. And, eventually put the team on my back and mature in a way that a 6-year-old should [laughs].”

Tim came up schooling kids on the field at a very young age. From the beginning, it was clear that he had something special, if unrefined.

 

“I was 2, but, I was playing like a 5-year-old. So technically I was ahead of the game, but I was ball hogging, trying to run to goal and score. All I really cared about was scoring. I didn’t really care about anything else. I thought I was playing by myself.”

 

Once Tim started to play traveling for Rosedale and Gottschee, that’s when the hard lessons of being a teammate hit him.

 

“I switched up and learned how to play with a team about the age of 6. I was benched sometimes so I had to figure out a way to make the starting lineup. And, eventually put the team on my back and mature in a way that a 6-year-old should [laughs].”

Game after game, lesson after lesson, hard practice after hard practice, Tim refined his game, eventually playing on the world stage for Paris-St.Germain F.C. and Team USA.

 

But getting there wasn’t easy. It took a lot of hard work and a little help from his city.

 

“Let’s put soccer aside. New York City is just one of those cities that builds people. It builds artists, basketball players, soccer players, into who they are today. I feel like New York built me, it made my mindset really strong. I give props to New York for making that happen.”

 

The city shows in his game. Whether he’s in Brooklyn, Queens, Paris, or stuffing hat tricks against other national teams, Tim remains a New Yorker.

 

But what about Tim’s dream? How can an 18 year old with a long career ahead of him already be thinking about the next generation of New York soccer players?

 

The answer is simple - 18 years is enough time to know that New Yorkers really can do anything.

 

“Coming from New York, I learned that with every hardship that you face, things are always going to get better once you put your mind to it. Confidence is key. Once you have that, you’re unstoppable.”

Game after game, lesson after lesson, hard practice after hard practice, Tim refined his game, eventually playing on the world stage for Paris-St.Germain F.C. and Team USA.

 

But getting there wasn’t easy. It took a lot of hard work and a little help from his city.

 

“Let’s put soccer aside. New York City is just one of those cities that builds people. It builds artists, basketball players, soccer players, into who they are today. I feel like New York built me, it made my mindset really strong. I give props to New York for making that happen.”

 

The city shows in his game. Whether he’s in Brooklyn, Queens, Paris, or stuffing hat tricks against other national teams, Tim remains a New Yorker.

 

But what about Tim’s dream? How can an 18 year old with a long career ahead of him already be thinking about the next generation of New York soccer players?

 

The answer is simple - 18 years is enough time to know that New Yorkers really can do anything.

 

“Coming from New York, I learned that with every hardship that you face, things are always going to get better once you put your mind to it. Confidence is key. Once you have that, you’re unstoppable.”

So he brings that confidence to every pitch he steps on. Wherever he is, he stands as a New Yorker, and as an example to all the other New Yorkers coming up behind him.

 

“I started out with nothing. I barely used to know how to kick a ball, but now I’m playing at the highest level. I just want them to know that they can do the same once they put their mind to it.”

 

He wants the world to know what happens when you just get rid of doubt.

 

When you just get to work.

When you just let the world know where you came from.

When you just do it.

So he brings that confidence to every pitch he steps on. Wherever he is, he stands as a New Yorker, and as an example to all the other New Yorkers coming up behind him.

 

“I started out with nothing. I barely used to know how to kick a ball, but now I’m playing at the highest level. I just want them to know that they can do the same once they put their mind to it.”

 

He wants the world to know what happens when you just get rid of doubt.

 

When you just get to work.

When you just let the world know where you came from.

When you just do it.

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