ALLIE KIEFFER

ALLIE KIEFFER

OCCUPATION: RUNNER

OCCUPATION: RUNNER

Runners find inspiration all over. Allie Kieffer just found hers closer to home. Ever since she could remember, she followed her big sister’s lead. Wherever she ran, Allie ran too. When the crossing guard at school suggested that her sister should join the local running club, Allie was right there with her, racing for candy and learning everything she could about the sport she came to love. 

Runners find inspiration all over. Allie Kieffer just found hers closer to home. Ever since she could remember, she followed her big sister’s lead. Wherever she ran, Allie ran too. When the crossing guard at school suggested that her sister should join the local running club, Allie was right there with her, racing for candy and learning everything she could about the sport she came to love. 

From then on out, there was no stopping Allie. What started as a way to connect with her sister became the makings of a dream. Success in high school turned into a scholarship to Wake Forest, where Allie imagined herself as a pro runner, even while reality came crashing down. “Going into my junior year of college, my sister was killed in a car accident,” Allie remembers.

 

The loss changed her mentality, about running as much as life. A bad race was now just that — a bad race. “That’s not low,” she says. “What’s the worse that happens? I don’t run the time I want? My family, my boyfriend, everyone is gonna love me.”

 

It’s a lesson that Allie has carried with her ever since. When a stress fracture during Olympic qualifiers forced her to take a job outside of running, she didn’t sulk. She didn’t quit. Instead, she thought back to what her sister taught her — then, put that perspective into practice. “I feel like I get to remember her and run with her, and be myself, and someone that she would be proud of.”

 

In the end, that’s all that really matters.

From then on out, there was no stopping Allie. What started as a way to connect with her sister became the makings of a dream. Success in high school turned into a scholarship to Wake Forest, where Allie imagined herself as a pro runner, even while reality came crashing down. “Going into my junior year of college, my sister was killed in a car accident,” Allie remembers.

 

The loss changed her mentality, about running as much as life. A bad race was now just that — a bad race. “That’s not low,” she says. “What’s the worse that happens? I don’t run the time I want? My family, my boyfriend, everyone is gonna love me.”

 

It’s a lesson that Allie has carried with her ever since. When a stress fracture during Olympic qualifiers forced her to take a job outside of running, she didn’t sulk. She didn’t quit. Instead, she thought back to what her sister taught her — then, put that perspective into practice. “I feel like I get to remember her and run with her, and be myself, and someone that she would be proud of.”

 

In the end, that’s all that really matters.

HOW THE CITY BREAKS THROUGH

HOW THE CITY BREAKS THROUGH

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