MEET THE DISRUPTERS

MEET THE DISRUPTERS

Meet the disrupters of the new Nike Sport Pack Collection.

 

The new collection distorts sport heritage and modern design with dynamic graphics and textiles for those who block out tradition to push the boundaries.

 

Inspired by the Collection, six artists redesigned the classic Nike Sportswear logo through their own aesthetic. Stay tuned this week for their stories and the insight behind their original pieces.

 

Meet the disrupters of the new Nike Sport Pack Collection.

 

The new collection distorts sport heritage and modern design with dynamic graphics and textiles for those who block out tradition to push the boundaries.

 

Inspired by the Collection, six artists redesigned the classic Nike Sportswear logo through their own aesthetic. Stay tuned this week for their stories and the insight behind their original pieces.

 

For Daniel and Weleh, the power to endure isn’t just part of the struggle: it’s the strength in their story.

 

“In the beginning of Kids of Immigrants, we would say that this pain will be worth it one day, and for us that’s what it means to endure. All these challenges and obstacles that we face, it’s going to be all worth it one day.”

 

Inspired by their immigrant parents, first-generation Americans Daniel and Weleh built their brand on the power of endurance — and some old-school meets new-world thrifting that represented exactly their mindsets.

 

“We would go to the thrift store and pick up vintage pieces. Collage is more than art: it’s about looking at your surroundings and doing the best with what you have. It’s taking something apart, putting your taste or perspective on something, giving it new meaning, and then giving it to the world.”

 

For their redesign of the Nike Sportswear logo, Daniel and Weleh channeled their immigrant parents and what it took for them to make it in America.

 

“We wanted to create something that was symbolic and we really felt that the eye of the tiger was the focus that you need to endure and go through the transition from your country into a new one.”

For Daniel and Weleh, the power to endure isn’t just part of the struggle: it’s the strength in their story.

 

“In the beginning of Kids of Immigrants, we would say that this pain will be worth it one day, and for us that’s what it means to endure. All these challenges and obstacles that we face, it’s going to be all worth it one day.”

 

Inspired by their immigrant parents, first-generation Americans Daniel and Weleh built their brand on the power of endurance — and some old-school meets new-world thrifting that represented exactly their mindsets.

 

“We would go to the thrift store and pick up vintage pieces. Collage is more than art: it’s about looking at your surroundings and doing the best with what you have. It’s taking something apart, putting your taste or perspective on something, giving it new meaning, and then giving it to the world.”

 

For their redesign of the Nike Sportswear logo, Daniel and Weleh channeled their immigrant parents and what it took for them to make it in America.

 

“We wanted to create something that was symbolic and we really felt that the eye of the tiger was the focus that you need to endure and go through the transition from your country into a new one.”

Ajani Russell thrives on being unconventional. Where others feel doubt, she feels drive. 

 

“When somebody tell me I can’t do something, I always immediately reject it. I never let other people’s opinions control me or dissuade me from doing something I have my heart set on.”

 

This tenacious attitude is more than a guideline in her life: it’s a fundamental part of the artist she is. The co-founder of the all-female skate crew Skate Kitchen relishes having rules set, only so she can have the opportunity to break them.

 

“A rule I live by is not to be ruled by fear. I don’t allow my actions and decisions to be decided on fears that I have. It only holds you back, and it’s not something that you can’t control holding you back: it’s you.”

 

For her Nike Sportswear logo redesign, Ajani let inspiration come from the most unconventional of places: her dreams.

 

“There’s been this specific set of creatures that I’ve been drawing for years, things that I’ve seen or interacted with in my dreams. They represent the struggles I face every day trying to use rhetoric. I use these images as a vehicle for translating my thoughts, my ideas and my emotions.”

Ajani Russell thrives on being unconventional. Where others feel doubt, she feels drive. 

 

“When somebody tell me I can’t do something, I always immediately reject it. I never let other people’s opinions control me or dissuade me from doing something I have my heart set on.”

 

This tenacious attitude is more than a guideline in her life: it’s a fundamental part of the artist she is. The co-founder of the all-female skate crew Skate Kitchen relishes having rules set, only so she can have the opportunity to break them.

 

“A rule I live by is not to be ruled by fear. I don’t allow my actions and decisions to be decided on fears that I have. It only holds you back, and it’s not something that you can’t control holding you back: it’s you.”

 

For her Nike Sportswear logo redesign, Ajani let inspiration come from the most unconventional of places: her dreams.

 

“There’s been this specific set of creatures that I’ve been drawing for years, things that I’ve seen or interacted with in my dreams. They represent the struggles I face every day trying to use rhetoric. I use these images as a vehicle for translating my thoughts, my ideas and my emotions.”

The universal pain of failure is more than an inspiration to Jide Osifeso: it’s his creative drive.

 

“I can’t relate to the biggest, strongest, fastest athlete, but I think everyone can relate to being a kid and being disappointed, not getting to where you wanted to be. To win bronze or to not even medal. The process of progression and becoming great includes missteps and a lot of disappointment, but I think that can be beautiful. I think that the process is more important than achieving the goal because it’s those moments that make you great.”

 

The design director of Hymne Studio is moved most not by those winning gold, but by those who keep reaching for greatness no matter the set backs along their path.

 

“Songs of Loss is the opposite of a victory song, but it’s just as important. When you start out doing something, you’re not going to be great. You’re going to fail. So the process of failing on a regular basis but then getting better and coming back stronger: that’s what I want to celebrate.”

 

For his Nike Sportswear logo redesign, Jide knew he wanted something expressive to visually represent the struggle of failing, again and again, but of always trying again.

 

“I wanted to look at failure in the eyes of a kid playing sports: you can see in their eyes the disappointment and in their expressions, ‘I didn’t get there this time.’ That’s a feeling that doesn’t go away the older you get. But that’s not sad, because it builds your character, your stamina, and whatever you need to be strong.”

The universal pain of failure is more than an inspiration to Jide Osifeso: it’s his creative drive.

 

“I can’t relate to the biggest, strongest, fastest athlete, but I think everyone can relate to being a kid and being disappointed, not getting to where you wanted to be. To win bronze or to not even medal. The process of progression and becoming great includes missteps and a lot of disappointment, but I think that can be beautiful. I think that the process is more important than achieving the goal because it’s those moments that make you great.”

 

The design director of Hymne Studio is moved most not by those winning gold, but by those who keep reaching for greatness no matter the set backs along their path.

 

“Songs of Loss is the opposite of a victory song, but it’s just as important. When you start out doing something, you’re not going to be great. You’re going to fail. So the process of failing on a regular basis but then getting better and coming back stronger: that’s what I want to celebrate.”

 

For his Nike Sportswear logo redesign, Jide knew he wanted something expressive to visually represent the struggle of failing, again and again, but of always trying again.

 

“I wanted to look at failure in the eyes of a kid playing sports: you can see in their eyes the disappointment and in their expressions, ‘I didn’t get there this time.’ That’s a feeling that doesn’t go away the older you get. But that’s not sad, because it builds your character, your stamina, and whatever you need to be strong.”

Jheyda McGarrell does things on her own terms.

 

“When people want me to shoot something, and they don’t want to accept what I view as beautiful and what I want to do with that, I don’t take that job. I just make art more for myself and for people that want me to be a part of their vision, not forcing me to create what they want. I don’t compromise.”

 

The photographer knows she holds power in her vulnerability and in her art, using her voice and platform as a way to help others feel powerful in their own way.

 

“We are moving into a place where we can see people and we can witness their complex identities, and allow them intersectionality of commenting on different things and the power to be whoever it is that they are. Everyone has always been raw in art, but I think now, people of different backgrounds, different appearances, different class levels, and different education levels, are getting more chances to be raw and take their rawness to something that can make them successful and make them well known.”

 

Jheyda creates her Nike Sportswear logo through the lens of her vulnerability and honesty, making a physical representation of her creative process.

 

“That’s what drove me to become serious about taking photos: representation for people that look like me. I’m obsessed with film because of the physical nature of it and how it makes moments a physical object, and how it makes everyone feel. I wanted to give the same attitude to my logo that I do to my process.”

Jheyda McGarrell does things on her own terms.

 

“When people want me to shoot something, and they don’t want to accept what I view as beautiful and what I want to do with that, I don’t take that job. I just make art more for myself and for people that want me to be a part of their vision, not forcing me to create what they want. I don’t compromise.”

 

The photographer knows she holds power in her vulnerability and in her art, using her voice and platform as a way to help others feel powerful in their own way.

 

“We are moving into a place where we can see people and we can witness their complex identities, and allow them intersectionality of commenting on different things and the power to be whoever it is that they are. Everyone has always been raw in art, but I think now, people of different backgrounds, different appearances, different class levels, and different education levels, are getting more chances to be raw and take their rawness to something that can make them successful and make them well known.”

 

Jheyda creates her Nike Sportswear logo through the lens of her vulnerability and honesty, making a physical representation of her creative process.

 

“That’s what drove me to become serious about taking photos: representation for people that look like me. I’m obsessed with film because of the physical nature of it and how it makes moments a physical object, and how it makes everyone feel. I wanted to give the same attitude to my logo that I do to my process.”

Benjie Escobar isn’t here for your cliche ideas of LA.

 

“I grew up building low-riders, seeing chain-link fences, barbed wire all over the place. In East LA, that’s just 

what you saw.”

 

Native to LA, Benjie refuses to settle for depicting his city as anything other than what it truly is. The creative takes pride in the multi-dimensional aspects of the city, using them to inspire his work.

 

“It’s both palm trees and barbed wire. It’s layered, and so is self-expression here.”

 

In his Nike Sportswear logo redesign, Benjie knew he wanted the East LA influence to shine through, and use the paradoxical beauty of his hometown to push his artistic boundaries.

Benjie Escobar isn’t here for your cliche ideas of LA.

 

“I grew up building low-riders, seeing chain-link fences, barbed wire all over the place. In East LA, that’s just 

what you saw.”

 

Native to LA, Benjie refuses to settle for depicting his city as anything other than what it truly is. The creative takes pride in the multi-dimensional aspects of the city, using them to inspire his work.

 

“It’s both palm trees and barbed wire. It’s layered, and so is self-expression here.”

 

In his Nike Sportswear logo redesign, Benjie knew he wanted the East LA influence to shine through, and use the paradoxical beauty of his hometown to push his artistic boundaries.

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